Write On The Run

 

need for speed

Where do you write?

In your car, on a train,

At the park, or baseball game?

On the job, or your lunch break

The ocean front, or at the lake?

(So I’m no Seuss)

 

I have a full time job at a coffeehouse. I love coffee, I really, really do. In fact I’m the general manager of the freakin coolest coffeehouse in Wichita Kansas. Coffee’s a passion of mine; it’s just as much a passion as writing is. I spend more than 60 hours a week at the coffeehouse.

But which is the bigger priority? What’s more important for me? Coffee Vs. Writing…who will be the victor? 

Sometimes I feel it’s the coffeehouse, because of the consistent paycheck it brings in. Other times I feel that writing is more important, which is such a part of my soul that when I neglect it I feel as though I’m neglecting my soul-mate.

And then I have to come back to the important question: Can I balance the two, and if so, how?

First of all, I don’t see that I have the option to neglect or quit writing. I also know that the rent will not get paid if I quit the coffeehouse, not to mention that the money I’d spend on coffee would put me on the street. My only option is to find time to balance the two loves – for practical, financial, and personal-purpose reasons.

So then. I have to chose which lover gets my time at what time. As of right now, my coffeehouse gets the majority of my day. But then, the night and early morning belongs to my literary Muse. And boy do we dance.

Since the priority of the day goes to the endless running of the shop I have to write on the go!

I keep a pad of paper and a pen in my pocket all the time. I also have my trusty (though frustrating sometimes)  Blackberry at my side at all moments. I’ve found that it’s easier to write quantity in the early morning when I wake up or in the evening before bed, when I keep my ideas logged throughout the day.

Ideas hit me constantly: while I’m making a drink for someone, writing the schedules, picking up milk, dropping off a deposit, etc. and as I keep myself in a habit of jotting down those ideas on a pad or in my Blackberry, later I send it to my e-mail so I can go over all the scribbles and I find that I actually have something creatively-pursuable.

Questions:

1. Do you have a fulltime job?

2. What writing habits do you have?

3. If you do have a fulltime job, when was the last time you finished a short story?

I want to encourage you full-timers, to not allow the pen and paper to be neglected. Don’t leave the Muse at home longing to be romanced. Even a step so small as jotting a few notes down during your busy day will help stir up the creative juices and get the creative side of your brain turning and churning – which is good.

Remember that you are a writer. The world NEEDS you! You are a superhero of sorts, creating worlds of temporary escape for those all over the world who need a moment of relief.

Write on the go, and see where it takes you.

Let me how it goes, and have fun!

We are a fellowship, a brotherhood whose words are immortal, endless, ageless. What we write lives far beyond our years. What we put to paper has the power to live and change lives generations after we’ve become dust. We are apart of long chain of artists whose words have made and changed history for the good and bad for thousands of years.

What an ability, what a gift, what a beautiful power. The power to create. The Writer’s.

 

Write, Write, Write!

We are The Writer’s, it’s what we do,

It’s who we are, it’s what we were

Created for.

 

SamTheWriter

Signing off.

Making Time For The Romance

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That’s what someone said to me today.

Well Sam, you’re a writer. You have to just make time for the romance. It’s like a real relationship.” 

Oh, I hate when people say crap like that, especially when they’re right.

Writing is just that; it’s a romance. It’s an intimate relationship between you, the creative potential that’s just fighting to get out, and your ability to organize and prioritize your crazy planet in such a way that you CREATE moments to be romantic.

I wrote a blog a while back (way too long ago) about romancing the Muse. It is so crazy vital for a writer or any kind of artist to romance their Muse, but sometimes you have to go against emotion and personal will power. Sometimes you have to MAKE it happen.

Many of the poems, articles, and short stories I have written, were written while I was under the intimate intoxication of the sheer overwhelming Moment I was having with my Muse. It’s in those times that I can pour out 12,000 words in an evening without stopping once to think, and it is usually really freaking good.  Unfortunately this only last a while. Then you have to work for it.

It really is like a relationship.

Stage One: If your dating, it’s like that period of time where you are so head over heels in love that the whole world is flowers and beautiful things.  Or when you get married (Congrads to my friend Jordan and Kayla who just tied the knot) and there’s that insane honeymoon stage where both people are so drunk on each other, that nothing on the planet could ever seem to be too unpleasant again, because you have each other forever.  And you can’t forget that somehow you are the only two people on the planet that are perfect, and you found each other. 

Stage One is freaking amazing. It’s just a lot of romancing, dreaming big, believing in magic, and having tons of sex. (I’m still talking literarily)

Stage Two: The magic slowly starts to wear down. You start to realize that, although  it’d be awesome to travel the world, make-out 8 hours a day, and  bask in each others perfection, truth is: There are other responsibilities. There is work to be done, errands to run, messes to clean up, other people in the world you have obligations to. Not only that but you notice the not as perfect things about each other. To make a long story a little less long: reality started to show up in not so pleasant ways.

As a writer this this that funk you get into where you start to realize that your love, writing, has it’s not so romantic aspects to it. You start to see that sometimes the Muse is not going to show up, sometimes the characters won’t speak. Sometimes work happens. Some times you are just too tired or stressed to think creatively.

This is when you have to decide about your Stage Three.

For some writers, this is the place where they decide the commitment demands too much. Some writers find themselves passionate about other things. But for those truly committed, sold out, romantic artistic lovers, this is the time to re-evaluate priorities. 

This is the time where you decide to break out of the funk. To say “I am a writer, that’s what I am, so now, what am I going to do with it?”

This is where you decide to find a way to get your fingers on a computer, or a pen in your hand, and force it on the paper.  This is where you Make the Time for the Romance.

This is the same way relationships work out. They either work or they don’t, and it all comes down to deciding who you are, and what your going to do about it.

If you need to find a good book about creative ways to write. Do it.

If you need to talk long walks on the beach, or around your neighborhood to get the Muse Juice flowing. Do it.

Listen to music

Read some poetry

Go fishing

Because once you have stretched and struggled through Stage Two, and determined to keep plunging forward, you’ve grown so much that the future trials just don’t seem as hard because you know what to expect and know to fight for what you love so much.

And when you create the habit of Make Time for the Romance… the passion just gets better and better.

The struggles will come, they always do. Just don’t give up, because we are something amazing.

We are writers.

 

Write, write, write

SamTheWriter,

Signing off.